Spironucleus muris and Eperythrozoon coccoides in Rodents from Northwestern Iran: Rare Infections

  • Soudabeh Heidari Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mehdi Mohebali Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. and Center for Research of Endemic Parasites of Iran, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Zabihollah Zarei Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mehdi Nateghpour Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Afsaneh Motevalli-Haghi Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Keywords: Spironucleus muris, Eperythrozoon coccoides, Rodents, Iran

Abstract

Background: Rodents perform a crucial role in dispersal of zoonosis causes globally. We aimed to investigation about infection levels of parasitic agents in rodents’ population in Meshkinshahr areas, northwest of Iran from Apr to Sep 2014. Methods: Two hundred four rodents were trapped and anaesthetized. A sample of blood was collected via cardi­opuncture from each one. Thin and thick blood smears were prepared and stained with Giemsa. All stained smear were examined under light microscopy with high magnification by two expert microscopists. Every suspected uni­cellular observed were measured microscopically and compared with key references to diagnose.Results: Captured rodents were identified as three genera including Meriones persicus, Mus musculus, Cricetulus migraturius. Protozoa identified in this study were included of Spironucleus muris and Eperythrozoon coccoides, these parasites were observed in blood smear of 0.98% of rodents. S. muris and E. coccoides were seen in M. mus­culus and C. migraturius, respectively.Conclusion: The present study increases awareness about Eperythrozoonosis in rodents and its potential transmis­sion to domestic animals and even to human in rural districts in Iran. Moreover, the attack of Spironucleus on the mucus of colon and its systemic risk was confirmed.

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Published
2018-10-12
How to Cite
1.
Heidari S, Mohebali M, Zarei Z, Nateghpour M, Motevalli-Haghi A. Spironucleus muris and Eperythrozoon coccoides in Rodents from Northwestern Iran: Rare Infections. J Arthropod Borne Dis. 12(4):334-340.
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Original Article